Tucson, Arizona - Dr. Schultz will teach graduate counseling courses in the Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling Program in the UA College of Education. As the research director for the Sonoran Center for Excellence in Disabilities, he will conduct research on current programs, as well as develop new research and programming initiatives.

Dallas, Texas - Ensuring patients with heart failure have access to the latest evidence-based care, and improved outcomes and quality of life, is at the core of a hospital certification program offered by the American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary organization dedicated to building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke, and The Joint Commission, the nation’s largest independent health care evaluation organization. Advanced Certification for Heart Failure is the first of multiple, jointly offered cardiac certifications that will be made available to hospitals seeking to implement exceptional efforts to foster better quality of care and outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease.

Washington, DC - Win Opportunity Knocks, doing business as Ottomanelli Wholesale Meats Inc., a St. Petersburg, Fla. establishment, is recalling approximately 6,020 pounds of fresh and frozen, raw ground beef products that may be contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O45, O103 and O145, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

Washington, DC - The largest coordinated research effort to study biological and non-biological factors associated with aggressive prostate cancer in African-American men has begun. The $26.5 million study is called RESPOND, or Research on Prostate Cancer in Men of African Ancestry: Defining the Roles of Genetics, Tumor Markers, and Social Stress. It will investigate environmental and genetic factors related to aggressiveness of prostate cancer in African-American men to better understand why they disproportionally experience aggressive disease - that is, disease that grows and spreads quickly - compared with men of other racial and ethnic groups.

Dallas, Texas - Approximately 75 percent of black and men women are likely to develop high blood pressure by the age of 55, compared to 55 percent of white men and 40 percent of white women in the same age range, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.