Phoenix, Arizona - Governor Doug Ducey, Thursday issued a proclamation congratulating the Tucson Rodeo Parade on their 93rd anniversary.

The Tucson Rodeo Parade is famous for being the nation’s longest non-motorized parade and attracts visitors from all over the United States and the world. The parade occurs during the week of the Tucson Rodeo and celebrates Arizona’s heritage by featuring folk dancers, marching musical groups, and historical wagons decorated by local groups, businesses, and schools.

“It’s hard to think of a better tradition or celebration of Arizona’s rich heritage than the Tucson Rodeo Parade. This historic parade captures the spirit of the Old West and a sense of community that we are proud to share with those visiting Tucson for the rodeo,” said Governor Ducey.

WHEREAS, in 1925, the inaugural La Fiesta de los Vaqueros Rodeo Parade, also known as the Tucson Rodeo Parade, kicked off the first Tucson Rodeo event; and

WHEREAS, the nation’s longest non-motorized parade showcases Arizona’s heritage with over 2,000 people marching, hundreds of horses and historical wagons creatively decorated by local business, organizations, and schools; and

WHEREAS, for the past 93 years, the Tucson Rodeo Parade has become a point of pride and long standing tradition for the City of Tucson and Southern Arizona; and

WHEREAS, the parade attracts more than 200,000 spectators from across the valley and around the world, filling the streets and grandstands to enjoy the rodeo festivities; and

WHEREAS, the parade also highlights the strong community in Tucson with generations of families participating in the parade and schools close to allow children to join the celebrations; and

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, Governor of the State of Arizona, do hereby proclaim February 22, 2018, as TUCSON RODEO PARADE DAY.

 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
caused to be affixed the Great Seal of the State of Arizona 


DONE at the Capitol in Phoenix on this ninth day of February in
the year Two Thousand and Eighteen and of the Independence of
the United States of America the Two Hundred and Forty-Second.